About Us

NIPANC is a Northern Ireland charity working to improve the outcomes of pancreatic cancer by:

  • Increasing public understanding of this cancer

  • Promoting awareness of the cancer’s signs and symptoms by both medical professionals and members of the public

  • Funding vital research

  • Supporting patients and their families

NIPANC has its roots in a group of people affected by pancreatic cancer coming together for support and to raise funds to promote better diagnosis and treatment for future patients.  

The charity’s work brings together families who have suffered losses from pancreatic cancer, families who are currently facing a diagnosis and survivors of the disease.

NIPANC concentrates its research funding in Northern Ireland, working collaboratively with others charities to fund vital research and promote early diagnosis of the disease.

NIPANC gives a stronger voice to families affected by pancreatic cancer in Northern Ireland.

Together we will press for necessary priority to be given to early diagnosis; encourage and support research into the development of new and innovative treatments; and provide advice and support to patients and families affected by the disease.

Working together we can make a real difference, changing the outcomes of pancreatic cancer and saving lives.

Thank you for your support

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Our Patron

Jamie Dornan, accepted a key role in NIPANC as our patron.

​Jamie's mum Lorna died of pancreatic cancer aged 50 in 1998 after 28 years of happy marriage during which Jim & Lorna had three children.

 

They were all shattered when the news of Lorna's illness hit out of the blue, but very grateful for the precious time they were afforded together after diagnosis thanks to the surgery and treatment she received in the months that followed.

​Jamie swung in behind the vibrant board at NIPANC to raise community awareness and funding for research such that this awful disease can be addressed head on, and other families spared the tragedy of losing a loved one far too early.